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Clinical PracticeFree Preview

Transient Ischemic Attack

List of authors.
  • Pierre Amarenco, M.D.

A suspected transient ischemic attack should be evaluated urgently in a clinical setting where appropriate specialist expertise and imaging (ideally diffusion-weighted imaging) are available. Management typically includes aspirin (immediately and indefinitely, with clopidogrel for the first 21 days), evaluation to identify the cause and guide intervention as appropriate, and control of risk factors.

Funding and Disclosures

Disclosure forms provided by the author are available with the full text of this article at NEJM.org.

Dr. Amarenco reports receiving grant support from Pfizer, Merck, and Boston Scientific, grant support and fees for serving on executive committees from AstraZeneca, fees for serving on an executive committee and fees for serving on a steering committee from Bayer, fees for serving on a data and safety monitoring board from Fibrogen, fees for serving on an end-point committee from GlaxoSmithKline, fees for serving on a data and safety monitoring board from Shinpoong Pharma, advisory board fees and lecture fees from Amgen, fees for serving on an executive committee from Kowa, grant support and advisory board fees from Sanofi, and grant support and fees for serving on a steering committee from Bristol-Myers Squibb. No other potential conflict of interest relevant to this article was reported.

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Neurology and Stroke Center, Assistance PubliqueCH?pitaux de Paris, SOS-TIA Clinic, Bichat Hospital, Laboratory for Vascular Translational Science, INSERM Unit 1148, Dpartement Hospitalo UniversitaireCFibrose Inflammation Remodelage, University of Paris, Paris.

Address reprint requests to Dr. Amarenco at the Department of Neurology and Stroke Center, Bichat Hospital, 46 rue Henri Huchard, Paris 75018, France, or at .

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